Paul E. Terry, PhD

Though hospitals were the slow adopters of EHRs, most are now fully engaged in trying to satisfy the federal requirement for “meaningful use” of an EHR thanks to CMS financial incentives. Still, as much as acceptance of the complex requirements needed to earn incentives is now a given with three fourths of health systems achieving stage 1 requirements, my discussions with providers from around the country leaves me observing that the intense focus on the details behind satisfying requirements has obscured the greater health policy picture.

Edie Castello

The United States spends considerable money on health care. Unfortunately, the clinical return on investment has been coming up short for years, according to Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, 2014 Update: How the U.S. Health Care System Compares Internationally, an oft-cited Commonwealth Fund study.

Krishna R. Patel, PharmD, RPh

If you haven’t already heard about the negative impact of formulary restrictions on adherence, well here it is. With mixed messages regarding formulary restrictions’ impact on patients, a recently published systematic literature review, published by Happe, et al., sought to get to the bottom this.

Norman S. Ryan, MD

Next year is a big year for Medicare Advantage plans. In 2015, they will not receive bonuses unless they have a 4-star rating or above. Many health plans are feeling under pressure right now, and may even feel a little disgruntled, as their businesses could really take a hit next year if they fall even slightly below 4.

One way to view this challenge that may take the edge off the pain is that the CMS Five Star Quality Rating System for Medicare Advantage Plans is not just about being able to stay or earn a spot in the Medicare Advantage program. Taking steps to improve ratings can help Medicare Advantage plans and other health plans hoping to enter the program achieve the Triple Aim and move them even closer to getting the business results they really want.

Steven R. Peskin, MD, MBA, FACP

This is my third installment on the Choosing Wisely Campaign from the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation and Consumer Reports that brings into sharp focus, and in plain English, the things patients and we physicians should question. The Choosing Wisely campaign now includes submissions by more than 60 medical professional societies and organizations. Examples include:

  • Why scheduling early delivery of your baby is not a good idea
  • Treating sinusitis: Don't rush to antibiotics
  • Don't perform annual stress cardiac imaging or advanced non-invasive imaging as part of routine follow-up in asymptomatic patients
  • Bone density tests: When you need them and when you don't
  • Treating migraine headaches: Some drugs should rarely be used

What prompted this update is a new video in the zeitgeist of today, with light music, happily dancing people from seniors to millennials, and scrolling text.

I am hoping to prompt readers of Managed Care to help to take viral this video for the important campaign to reduce unneeded and in some cases harmful medical testing, treatments, and services. A wise choice!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FqQ-JuRDkl8

Steven R. Peskin, MD, MBA, FACP, is associate clinical professor of medicine at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey – Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, and is governor of the American College of Physicians, New Jersey South.

Michael Flanagan
Michael Flanagan

Uncertainty regarding health insurance exchanges is not going away. Changing enrollment deadlines and newly insured populations have brought challenges to payers and providers. Success will require staying competitive on price, network quality, and access.

Paul E. Terry, PhD

One of the more audacious promises of the accountable care organization (ACO) movement is the idea that providers of medical services can play a larger role in improving a population’s health. It stems from a notion that health care financing reforms will move the focus of providers from “the tyranny of the office visit” to activities where success will be judged according to improvement in clinical metrics whether a patient visits the office or not. It’s the right vision from a health promotion advocate’s vantage point because it may serve as a preamble to an era where medical and public health practices and public policies truly intersect.

Steven R. Peskin, MD, MBA, FACP

The title of this post might also read "Don't Mess with Mother Nature"

We have seen remarkable improvements in human health as a direct result of the science that has brought us our antibiotic age with significant reductions in infant mortality, deaths due to bacterial pneumonia, and other serious infections that sometimes led to systemic infection and death.

Fast forward to today, when we may obtain with a prescription many of these powerful germ killers for $4 at WalMart and Target and drug and grocery store chains. Some retailers even give away a prescribed course of antibiotics as a loss leader to entice the customer to enter that store.

The liberal (excessive, really) use of antibiotics in the United States and much of the rest of the world is having profound unintended negative consequences.

Steven R. Peskin, MD, MBA, FACP

Three days of a severe headache that would not respond to the ibuprofen, naproxen, or acetaminophen. "I never get headaches" is what I said multiple times to my wife and to colleagues. The morning of day three, a rash started to appear on my forehead, in the left eyebrow, in the scalp, with swelling around the left eye and swollen lymph nodes at the angle of the jaw on the left. My wife mentioned "shingles". Poor early diagnosis on my part, and, I said "Oh !*#%! that is what I have".

Paul E. Terry, PhD

Recently a Minnesota school was evacuated after 10 students got sick during choir practice. A carbon monoxide leak was the presumed cause, given the similarity of student’s symptoms and the rapid spread of complaints. Thirty students in all were taken to the hospital and the school was closed for the day. Tests proved negative, recovery was quick, and the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) now reports that the likely cause was psychogenic illness.

The state spokesman said that when people in a group become ill at the same time with subjective complaints, “It is no less real.”

Pages

Managed Care’s Top Ten Articles of 2016

There’s a lot more going on in health care than mergers (Aetna-Humana, Anthem-Cigna) creating huge players. Hundreds of insurers operate in 50 different states. Self-insured employers, ACA public exchanges, Medicare Advantage, and Medicaid managed care plans crowd an increasingly complex market.

Major health care players are determined to make health information exchanges (HIEs) work. The push toward value-based payment alone almost guarantees that HIEs will be tweaked, poked, prodded, and overhauled until they deliver on their promise. The goal: straight talk from and among tech systems.

They bring a different mindset. They’re willing to work in teams and focus on the sort of evidence-based medicine that can guide health care’s transformation into a system based on value. One question: How well will this new generation of data-driven MDs deal with patients?

The surge of new MS treatments have been for the relapsing-remitting form of the disease. There’s hope for sufferers of a different form of MS. By homing in on CD20-positive B cells, ocrelizumab is able to knock them out and other aberrant B cells circulating in the bloodstream.

A flood of tests have insurers ramping up prior authorization and utilization review. Information overload is a problem. As doctors struggle to keep up, health plans need to get ahead of the development of the technology in order to successfully manage genetic testing appropriately.

Having the data is one thing. Knowing how to use it is another. Applying its computational power to the data, a company called RowdMap puts providers into high-, medium-, and low-value buckets compared with peers in their markets, using specific benchmarks to show why outliers differ from the norm.
Competition among manufacturers, industry consolidation, and capitalization on me-too drugs are cranking up generic and branded drug prices. This increase has compelled PBMs, health plan sponsors, and retail pharmacies to find novel ways to turn a profit, often at the expense of the consumer.
The development of recombinant DNA and other technologies has added a new dimension to care. These medications have revolutionized the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and many of the other 80 or so autoimmune diseases. But they can be budget busters and have a tricky side effect profile.

Shelley Slade
Vogel, Slade & Goldstein

Hub programs have emerged as a profitable new line of business in the sales and distribution side of the pharmaceutical industry that has got more than its fair share of wheeling and dealing. But they spell trouble if they spark collusion, threaten patients, or waste federal dollars.

More companies are self-insuring—and it’s not just large employers that are striking out on their own. The percentage of employers who fully self-insure increased by 44% in 1999 to 63% in 2015. Self-insurance may give employers more control over benefit packages, and stop-loss protects them against uncapped liability.