Peter Boland
Ezekiel J. Emanuel’s Prescription for the Future is true to its title and proposes a five- to 10-year agenda for transforming expensive, wasteful American health care into a system that delivers high-value care. This is a qualitative book based on case studies that identify and systematize how to improve quality, patient experience, and cost.
The overall infant mortality rate in the U.S. declined 14% between 2005 and 2015, from 6.86 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2005 to 5.90 in 2015, according to the CDC. However, CDC researchers found wide variation among the states, ranging from 9.08 deaths per 1,000 live births in Mississippi (the highest rate), to 4.28 deaths per 1,000 live births in Massachusetts (the lowest).
Women who were new patients waited an average of nearly 24 days to be seen by an ob/gyn, according to research by Athenahealth. In contrast, the new-patient wait to see for an orthopedist was 13 days. Waits for first appointments with primary care physicians, pediatricians, and cardiologists fell in between those two extremes.

News Wire

Law journal article considers the strategy’s legal and ethical implications
New CEO believes “breakthrough innovations” are key to future growth
But lawmakers are far from united on the issue
Tablets are also indicated to treat drug-induced extrapyramidal reactions
Nearly 68% of patients treated with AR101 could tolerate peanut protein
Women’s Health
Lola Butcher
High Caesarean section rates. Too many babies in the NICU. There are indications that maternity and newborn care in this country is far from ideal. Some payers are betting that bundled payments for obstetricians will create incentives to make changes and reduce low-value care.
Richard Mark Kirkner
The plaintiffs are now defendants and vice versa in the drawn-out dispute over ACA birth control coverage.
Zachary Hafner
Women are a key focus segment for health care organizations both because of the medical services they utilize as individuals and the influence they have on the health care of others. In one survey, 59% of women and 94% of working moms reported making or heavily influencing health care decisions for their entire families.
CURRENT ISSUE February 2018

Women’s Health

Sexual harassment and abuse in health care are not a recent phenomenon. Men in positions of power as physicians and as supervisors have been perpetrators for a long, long time. But the #MeToo movement and its progeny, #TimesUp, have created a new awareness in the health care sector as they have elsewhere. Our story reviews the evidence and discusses some of the nuances and the way forward.

We also tackle more traditional managed care topics. Bundled payments for maternity care make sense and have been shown to have some positive effects (reducing the number of unnecessary Caesarean sections, for example). We look at some of the reasons they’ve had difficulty catching on.

Another story in this issue considers the future of the Pap test. It’s been a good run for a test that has greatly reduced the incidence of cervical cancer but HPV vaccination and testing may conspire to make it obsolete. 

UPCOMING MEETINGS

Philadelphia, PA
February 26, 2018 to February 28, 2018
Washington DC
February 27, 2018
Washington DC
February 27, 2018 to March 1, 2018
Washington DC
February 27, 2018 to March 1, 2018
Orlando, FL
March 5, 2018 to March 6, 2018
Orlando, FL
March 5, 2018 to March 6, 2018
Orlando, FL
March 5, 2018 to March 6, 2018
The rate of developmental disabilities for children ages 3 to 17 in the United States rose from 5.76% in 2014 to 6.99% in 2016, according to the CDC. The prevalence of children who had been diagnosed with a developmental delay other than autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disability also increased from 3.57% to 4.55%.
Cover Story
Susan Ladika
Women make up most of the workforce, but men are in positions of power. Sexual harassment and abuse are common and deep-seated problems in American health care. Women in health care are speaking up and forcing executives and physicians to face the issue.
In theory, ACOs are groups of providers that band together to lower the cost of health while maintaining its quality by using various tools in the value-based care (aka population health) toolkit: care coordination, data analytics, avoidance of low-value services. But a study published in this month’s…